In 2001, the Indian government banned the landing of all species of chondrichthyan fish in its ports. The shark’s small eyes and slender teeth suggest that it is primarily a fish-eater and is adapted to turbid, murky water. Because of its rarity, the Ganges shark is not often heard of outside India, though it was mentioned briefly in an episode of Shark Week focusing on its relative, the bull shark. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Ganges shark (Glyphis gangeticus) is a critically endangered species of requiem shark found in the Ganges River (Padma River) and the Brahmaputra River of Bangladesh and India. The bull shark can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater and can travel far up rivers. The bull shark is common in the coastal areas of warm oceans, in rivers and lakes, and occasionally streams if they are deep enough in both salt and fresh water. However, only the head of the shark appears in the photo. It inhabits the River Hooghly in West Bengal, as well as the rivers Ganges, Brahmaputra, and the Mahanadi. The bull shark is well known for its unpredictable, often aggressive behavior. The bull shark is common in the coastal areas of warm oceans, in rivers and lakes, and in both salt and fresh water. What Do Bull Sharks Eat? The Ganges shark is widely feared as a ferocious man-eater. There is an urgent need for a detailed survey of the shark fisheries of the Bay of Bengal. The Ganges shark was originally known only from three nineteenth century museum specimens: one each in the Muséum national d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris, Humboldt Museum, Berlin and Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta. Others suggest that the Bull shark even lives in freshwater Lake Nicaragua, in the Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers of West Bengal, and Assam in Eastern India and adjoining Bangladesh. Bull sharks are large and stout, with females being larger than males. Ganges shark. The Ganges shark (Glyphis gangeticus) is a critically endangered species of requiem shark found in the Ganges River (Padma River) and the Brahmaputra River of Bangladesh and India. https://chondrichthyes.fandom.com/wiki/Ganges_shark?oldid=795. In India, the bull shark may be confused with the Sundarbans or Ganges shark. Overfishing, habitat degradation from pollution, increasing river use, and management, including construction of dams and barrages, are the principal threats. [3], The upper teeth have high, broad, serrated, triangular cusps and the labial furrows are very short. Ganges Shark and common bull shark are freshwater river systems requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. Broadfin shark. The bull shark can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater and can travel far up rivers. A widespread, albeit widely dispersed, artisanal fishery exists for both local consumption and international trade. They have also seen in the rivers of Amazon, Mississippi, Brahmaputra, and Brisbane. It is amongst the 20 most threatened shark species and is listed as a Critically Endangered species in the IUCN Redlist. According to many experts, bull sharks are one of the most dangerous sharks in the world. The Grey nurse shark was also blamed during the sixties and seventies. It is also found in the fresh water Lake Nicaragua and the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers of West Bengal and Assam in eastern India and adjoining Bangladesh. [27], The biological differences between the Ganges shark and bull shark also point to a lower likelihood of attacks on humans by the Ganges shark. Bull shark also swims in freshwater of West Bengal’s Brahmaputra Rivers and Lake Nicaragua. It is typically found in the middle to lower reaches of a river. In India, the bull shark may be confused with the Sundarbans or Ganges shark. [10] However, in the Bay of Bengal, G. gangeticus was found to feed heavily on dasyatid stingrays, which spend much of their time on the bottom. The shark's small eyes and slender teeth suggest that it is primarily a fish-eater and is adapted to turbid water. A specimen collected 84 km upstream of the mouth of the Hooghly River at Mahishadal in 2001 was identified as G. gangeticus but on photographs of the jaw only. Species With Barcodes: 1. It is worth noting that the size at birth or maturity is unknown for any other Glyphis species, save the speartooth shark, for which adult size has recently been obtained. River Ganga supports many bird species that are uniquely found in India. Typically found in the Ganga, Hooghly, Mahanadi, and Brahmaputra rivers of India, the distribution of the species recently expanded when, as the result of various genetic studies, the Borneo river shark (G. fowlerae) and the Irrawaddy river shark (G. siamensis) were reclassified as part of the Ganges shark species. They are found to a depth of 150 m, but does not usually swim deeper than 30 m.[3] The bull shark, ''Carcharhinus leucas'', also known as Zambezi shark or unofficially known as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a shark common worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas), also known as the "Zambezi shark" (informally "zambi") in Africa, and "Lake Nicaragua shark" in Nicaragua, is a requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. While at the mouth of the St.Lucia estuary, we witnessed a Bull-Shark hunting fish up and down the lake. Rome: FAO. Unlike many other species of sharks, the Ganges shark is regarded as a true river shark and is only found within the middle and lower reaches of … [22], G. gangeticus is one of 20 sharks on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List of endangered shark species. [6], A typical requiem shark in its external appearance, it is stocky, with two spineless dorsal fins and an anal fin. Ganges Shark and common bull shark are freshwater river systems requiem shark commonly found worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. The Ganges shark, Glyphis gangeticus, is listed as a critically endangered species on the IUCN red list.The species is so rare, that after a single sighting in 2006, the species was not seen again until 2016, when it reemerged at a local Mumbai fish market.. The Bull shark is common in coastal areas of warm oceans, in rivers and lakes, both in salt and fresh water. Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. No records exist between 1867 until 1996, and the 1996 records have not been confirmed as G. gangeticus. Angel sharks are known for having flattened bodies and a broad pectoral fins. The bull shark is responsible for attacks around the Sydney Harbour inlets. (2009). Boeseman (1964) noted that "most of the recorded C. gyngeticus from outside the Indo-Pakistan Peninsula (excepting those from Japan and possibly, from Viti-Levu, Fiji Islands), are identical with C. leucas Müller and Henle. Sharks of the world. The bull shark is well known for its unpredictable, often aggressive behavior. It has internal nictitating eyelids. The Bull shark has traveled a great distance, 2,500 miles, up the Amazon River to Iquitos in Peru, and north Bolivia. Jan 16, 2020 - ganges shark - The Ganges shark is a critically endangered species of requiem shark found in the Ganges River and the Brahmaputra River of Bangladesh and India. It is uniformly grey to brownish in color, with no discernible markings. Overfishing, habitat degradation from pollution, increasing river use and management, including construction of dams and barrages are the principle threats. [3] However, their life history cycle is probably similar to other river sharks, characterized by long gestation, slow growth, delayed maturity, and small litter size. [6] The specimen is a 60-cm-long immature male. However, in the Bay of Bengal, G. gangeticus was found to feed heavily on dasyatid stingrays, which spend much of their time on the bottom. The name, "bull shark," comes from its stocky shape and broad, flat snout. The bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas, also known as Zambezi shark or unofficially known as Zambi in Africa and Nicaragua shark in Nicaragua, is a shark common worldwide in warm, shallow waters along coasts and in rivers. It is known for its aggressive nature, and presence in warm, shallow brackish and freshwater systems including estuaries and rivers. [11], The Ganges shark, as its name suggests, is largely restricted to the rivers of eastern and northeastern India, particularly the Hooghly River of West Bengal, and the Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Mahanadi in Bihar, Assam, and Odisha, respectively. Others suggest that the Bull shark even lives in freshwater Lake Nicaragua, in the Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers of West Bengal, and Assam in Eastern India and adjoining Bangladesh. [2], The Ganges shark is widely feared as a ferocious man-eater,[26] but most of the attacks attributed to it are probably the result of confusion with the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas. However, only the head of the shark appears in the photo. The second dorsal fin is relatively large, but much smaller than the first (about half the height). (EN). The genus is currently considered to contain three recent species; genetic evidence has shown that both the Borneo river shark (G. fowlerae) and Irrawaddy river shark (G. siamensis) should be regarded as synonyms of the Ganges shark, expanding the range of the species to Pakistan, Myanmar, Borneo, and Java. [11], Glyphis: from Greek glyphe, means "carving".[28]. International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List, 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2007.RLTS.T9281A12978210.en, "DNA capture reveals transoceanic gene flow in endangered river sharks", "The Mysterious, Endangered River Sharks (, Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, "FAO Species Catalogue. Thought to be consumed locally for its meat, the Ganges shark is caught by gillnet and its oil, along with that of the Ganges and Indus river dolphins, is highly sought after as a fish attractant. In Africa it is often called Zambezi River Shark or just Zambi. This likely includes the rivers rivers Hooghly, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mahanadi [4, 5]. It is often confused with the more common bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas), which also inhabits the Ganges River and is sometimes incorrectly referred to as the Ganges shark.
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